Ford Focus ST Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
no not by me
can someone tell me wha all these lines actually mean, now i know the obvious bhp torque etc but what makes a good curve, were should the lines be, straight up is good/bad, a gentle curve is good/bad see what i mean?
anyway heres mine from last week {take the bhp with a pinch of salt } where could it be improved on and what does it all mean
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
2017 Audi S3 Sportsback
Joined
·
8,082 Posts
Would not have gone down the DS route if i knew that Mountune got those results
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Like i said earlier, there has been some controversy over the bhp produced on the day {although how some cars got exactly what there owners were expecting and ten minutes later we get slated for our results have already been discussed elsewhere} its the lines i was trying to understand, i was of the impression that if it goes up like a ski slope effect thats good but then i havent a clue what i,m talking about

not going on about the dubious bhp figures
but if you look at this with a standard mountune on the same rolling road i dont know how to explain it
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE(Thunder#59 @ 28 Nov 2009, 06:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>wow impressed!!

how much does the montune conversion cost?

£1000 ish, but i,m getting sidetracked here thats not the reason for this post
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,718 Posts
QUOTE(loko @ 28 Nov 2009, 04:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>no not by me
can someone tell me wha all these lines actually mean, now i know the obvious bhp torque etc but what makes a good curve, were should the lines be, straight up is good/bad, a gentle curve is good/bad see what i mean?
anyway heres mine from last week {take the bhp with a pinch of salt } where could it be improved on and what does it all mean


If anyone gets the message
i would like to no what the good and bad curves are
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
QUOTE(loko @ 28 Nov 2009, 04:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>no not by me
can someone tell me wha all these lines actually mean, now i know the obvious bhp torque etc but what makes a good curve, were should the lines be, straight up is good/bad, a gentle curve is good/bad see what i mean?
anyway heres mine from last week {take the bhp with a pinch of salt } where could it be improved on and what does it all mean


Peak bhp & torque figures can be mis-leading & high peaks readings do not necessarily translate into a usable map.
2 things point towards a good map, area under the curve and smoothness of the curves i.e. no great peaks & troughs getting to the peak.

You have some good results there, the torque curve rises steeply & is then good & flat, intersecting the power curve high up, this is good.
Translates to usable in gear pulling power rather than a peaky 'rev-hungry' power delivery.

There are no dips/troughs in the power curve, shows the fuelling is spot-on through the rev-range.
Broadly speaking for bhp nice smooth rise as 'fat' as possible to peak power and holding onto that peak rather than dying off rapidly
is desirable. For torque, a rapid early rise that is smooth & flat, intersecting the power curve as high up as possible (i.e. good strong pull
across the whole rev range).

Pretty much ignore the numbers (as you have done), dynos are a good relative measurement tool. If you make changes then go back to the same dyno
to compare, don't waste your time/money tying yourself in knots trying to reconcilliate a difference measured on another dyno.

I'd be very happy with these results & invest in the best tyres you can afford to enjoy it!

Hope that helps,
Jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,716 Posts
QUOTE(JayGee @ 28 Nov 2009, 09:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Peak bhp & torque figures can be mis-leading & high peaks readings do not necessarily translate into a usable map.
2 things point towards a good map, area under the curve and smoothness of the curves i.e. no great peaks & troughs getting to the peak.

You have some good results there, the torque curve rises steeply & is then good & flat, intersecting the power curve high up, this is good.
Translates to usable in gear pulling power rather than a peaky 'rev-hungry' power delivery.

There are no dips/troughs in the power curve, shows the fuelling is spot-on through the rev-range.
Broadly speaking for bhp nice smooth rise as 'fat' as possible to peak power and holding onto that peak rather than dying off rapidly
is desirable. For torque, a rapid early rise that is smooth & flat, intersecting the power curve as high up as possible (i.e. good strong pull
across the whole rev range).

Pretty much ignore the numbers (as you have done), dynos are a good relative measurement tool. If you make changes then go back to the same dyno
to compare, don't waste your time/money tying yourself in knots trying to reconcilliate a difference measured on another dyno.

I'd be very happy with these results & invest in the best tyres you can afford to enjoy it!

Hope that helps,
Jon

That's good advice. All rolling roads differ in their results. It all depends how they are calibrated, how efficient the fans are etc. The best way to get a good idea of how your car performs is to stick to one set of rollers. Then you can see if any future mods are actually making a difference. Your graph looks a nice smooth one, which is to be expected from Mountune.


*Edit. Just realised I was looking at the 2nd graph you put on. That looks spot on. Looked at yours & really can't make much of it. They were both in 4th & yet wildly different. Can you not get a re-run there ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
QUOTE(JayGee @ 28 Nov 2009, 09:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Peak bhp & torque figures can be mis-leading & high peaks readings do not necessarily translate into a usable map.
2 things point towards a good map, area under the curve and smoothness of the curves i.e. no great peaks & troughs getting to the peak.

You have some good results there, the torque curve rises steeply & is then good & flat, intersecting the power curve high up, this is good.
Translates to usable in gear pulling power rather than a peaky 'rev-hungry' power delivery.

There are no dips/troughs in the power curve, shows the fuelling is spot-on through the rev-range.
Broadly speaking for bhp nice smooth rise as 'fat' as possible to peak power and holding onto that peak rather than dying off rapidly
is desirable. For torque, a rapid early rise that is smooth & flat, intersecting the power curve as high up as possible (i.e. good strong pull
across the whole rev range).

Pretty much ignore the numbers (as you have done), dynos are a good relative measurement tool. If you make changes then go back to the same dyno
to compare, don't waste your time/money tying yourself in knots trying to reconcilliate a difference measured on another dyno.

I'd be very happy with these results & invest in the best tyres you can afford to enjoy it!

Hope that helps,
Jon

thanks jon, that was exactly what i was looking for


QUOTE(RS2kJane @ 29 Nov 2009, 08:41 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>That's good advice. All rolling roads differ in their results. It all depends how they are calibrated, how efficient the fans are etc. The best way to get a good idea of how your car performs is to stick to one set of rollers. Then you can see if any future mods are actually making a difference. Your graph looks a nice smooth one, which is to be expected from Mountune.


*Edit. Just realised I was looking at the 2nd graph you put on. That looks spot on. Looked at yours & really can't make much of it. They were both in 4th & yet wildly different. Can you not get a re-run there ?

the only reason i can think for a difference in the 2 graphs is that mine {the top one} has a downpipe and sportcat and the other is just straightforward mountune
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
QUOTE(loko @ 29 Nov 2009, 05:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>thanks jon, that was exactly what i was looking for


the only reason i can think for a difference in the 2 graphs is that mine {the top one} has a downpipe and sportcat and the other is just straightforward mountune

The cat & downpipe are providing masses more torque over the standard Mountune graph.
Compare the 2 relative areas under the line, massive difference & your line barely tails off after the peak.
Max power figures are similar. Essentially torque translates to ability to accelerate & BHP = top speed.
So your car should take off in any gear, in the words of James May "like a stabbed rat."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
A nice flat torque curve is what your after and as said thats what you've got, also the power doesnt tend to die away at the top end like cars with just a remap tend to, you shuld be happy and it should drive well.

QUOTE(loko @ 29 Nov 2009, 05:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>the only reason i can think for a difference in the 2 graphs is that mine {the top one} has a downpipe and sportcat and the other is just straightforward mountune

I would say different roalling roads and days will be the main reason for the differences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
QUOTE(JayGee @ 30 Nov 2009, 12:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>So your car should take off in any gear, in the words of James May "like a stabbed rat."

it does that alright


QUOTE(c.b @ 30 Nov 2009, 01:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I would say different roalling roads and days will be the main reason for the differences.
thats a point i was trying to make, they were both done on the same rolling road
i guess a sportcat and downpipe have more benefits than some may think, thanks for all the explanations, i think i understand it now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,718 Posts
QUOTE(JayGee @ 28 Nov 2009, 09:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Peak bhp & torque figures can be mis-leading & high peaks readings do not necessarily translate into a usable map.
2 things point towards a good map, area under the curve and smoothness of the curves i.e. no great peaks & troughs getting to the peak.

You have some good results there, the torque curve rises steeply & is then good & flat, intersecting the power curve high up, this is good.
Translates to usable in gear pulling power rather than a peaky 'rev-hungry' power delivery.

There are no dips/troughs in the power curve, shows the fuelling is spot-on through the rev-range.
Broadly speaking for bhp nice smooth rise as 'fat' as possible to peak power and holding onto that peak rather than dying off rapidly
is desirable. For torque, a rapid early rise that is smooth & flat, intersecting the power curve as high up as possible (i.e. good strong pull
across the whole rev range).

Pretty much ignore the numbers (as you have done), dynos are a good relative measurement tool. If you make changes then go back to the same dyno
to compare, don't waste your time/money tying yourself in knots trying to reconcilliate a difference measured on another dyno.

I'd be very happy with these results & invest in the best tyres you can afford to enjoy it!

Hope that helps,
Jon

Thanks for info Jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
QUOTE(don kalmar union @ 30 Nov 2009, 03:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>This is scary and not very quick...

you mean the cars scary or the results
{thanks for putting up a comparison btw}
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top