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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to get some better software for touching up my digital pics, as I currently only have the software Canon ship with the camera. Photoshop is the obvious candidate, but im not splashing £5-600 on software i might only use a few times a month... The Adobe elements software looks like it might be a goer, but looking for any advise / suggestions really from people who use it or other similar products... I do have Google Picassa too, but thats really more for filing, tagging etc... Also, will elements make the correction for where you photograph tall buildings, trees etc and they look to be curving into the photo rather than straight? I cant remember the fancy name for it...

Cheers,

Mark
 

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Graham - mk2 stage 3
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I use Lightroom 2 and Photoshop CS3. There are a number of people who think that LR2 and Elements can do most things for most people. However, if you are not shooting Raw files and don't want the indexing features that LR has Elements is a very good bet.

The Gimp is free and very powerful, but is quirky to use and (for me) has a steep learning curve.

I think that Corel Paint Shop Pro or the latest version (X2?) might be a bit more advanced than PS Elements, but I found that it was not as easy to use and there are so few tutorials out there in comparison with PS.

The effect you are talking about is converging verticals and There are two ways that I know this can be corrected. First is that CS3 has a tool for lens correction. Not sure if elements has this. You can also use the transform tool, but again, not sure if Elements has this one either. The Gimp might well have these tools to correct CVs, but you will need lots of space above the top of your subject to successfully correct it without loosing the top of the subject through the top of the frame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK, I do shoot in RAW all the time though, does that put elements out of the equation?
 

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Graham - mk2 stage 3
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QUOTE(mbaker @ 25 Jan 2010, 01:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;OK, I do shoot in RAW all the time though, does that put elements out of the equation?&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&amp;lt;br /&amp;gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;

Not at all. Elements can handle RAW files afaik. Just make sure that you get the latest version to ensure that the ACR supports your camera. Usually/often earlier versions cannot be upgraded. There is a free plug-in for the Gimp that will enable it to handle RAWs. I'm sure that you can get a free 30 day trial of most software including Elements to see if it suits you.
 

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i would say go for Photoshop, either CS3 or CS4. It is VERY difficult to get to grips with but get yourself a good guide book and watch the tutorials on youtube. you wont regret it!
 

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I just started using Lightroom which seems pretty well set up for most photo work, still have CS4 incase I want to go to town on something but LR seems to do pretty much everything I need and a dam site easier to boot.
 

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Lightroom is very good. My friend who is a professional photographer in the USA uses it all the time and he's using a Mamiya with Phase One digital back shooting RAW.
 

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QUOTE(Lancastrian @ 1 Feb 2010, 02:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Lightroom is very good. My friend who is a professional photographer in the USA uses it all the time and he's using a Mamiya with Phase One digital back shooting RAW.

I might give that a try, i just use cs4 and elements
 

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QUOTE(theboy @ 2 Feb 2010, 12:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>What do you gain by shooting in RAW? And if so should i be doing or can i do this with a Cannon 350D



Seems to be down to what you want from your pics, As I understand it, in brief, RAW will give you more scope for working in Photoshop as you can adjust white balance and regain a few exposure stops with relative ease and you dont lose any detail from the JPG compression routine.... however it is huge files, slow to work with, need converted before you can do anything else with them etc etc.

So I guess it is down to how much time you want to spend in front of PC - I plan to just use JPG unless it is something I really really want to get perfect, in which case will shoot both JPG & RAW.
 

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Graham - mk2 stage 3
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QUOTE(theboy @ 2 Feb 2010, 12:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>What do you gain by shooting in RAW? And if so should i be doing or can i do this with a Cannon 350D

If you use jpegs at the moment, the camera will apply some processing to the image file that you have only limited control over. Things like sharpening, contrast, brightness and overall colour. So the file you end up with is not 'as shot', but is with the enhancements your camera thinks it should have. These changes are permanent and cannot be undone.

Pluses with RAW are the ability to change things after you took the picture - exposure, white balance and more. Any changes you make are not permanent and will not change the original file which is always available 'as shot'.

Minuses are that you have to have an extra stage in the processing - the RAW conversion. This replaces the in camera processing that it does with jpeg files. Raw files need some tweaking in the converter to get the best results, but the end result is better than with jpegs.

Not a Canon user, but I think the 350D can shoot in RAW. You should find it in the menu sytem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If you do shoot in RAW all the time and have some pics you dont want to mess about with, its quick and easy to do a batch convert to change them all over to JPG and resize them at the same time using the Canon software, though I cant remember off the top of my head which application does it. I always resize my pics anyway as very few people want a 4000 pixel wide pic, 800 is usually big enough, plus with the RAW file, you can always drop another out very easily. Downside as said is the RAW files do take up a lot of hard disk space in comparison. Depends what you want your photos for really...
 

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Sounds a bit much for me that. I have a copy of photoshop but i never really use it apart from to alter silly pictures of people. I think i will stick to using large jpeg files as the only editing of the bike pictures i tend to do is crop
 
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