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Could someone post up some pics of different bulb temps i.e. 6k, 8k and 10k not sure what colour to get want to have a look at some pics before i buy

Thanks
 

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6K is about the most I'd ever go for, anything more than that and you're losing a lot of light and they go more blue than white.
 

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A quick Google search found this...

Light Automotive lighting Purple Font Visual effect lighting

I saw someone the other night with the 30k bulbs. Got to ask yourself (a) Can they actually see anything and (b) How many times have they been pulled.
 

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I had 6ks on my last car and they were great! a really pure white light! Never got pulled, but unfortunately there not legal for an mot... don't ask me why something to do with self levelling headlights and washers required! Hope this helps!
 

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I had 6ks on my last car and they were great! a really pure white light! Never got pulled, but unfortunately there not legal for an mot... don't ask me why something to do with self levelling headlights and washers required! Hope this helps!
Most focus' have Xenons as standard, so there's not a legality issue.

I'm still not sure what to believe when it comes to the self levelling thing, I've had a well respected mechanic tell me that it'll fail, but from my own reading of the MOT wording and from what I've read on other forums, if they're there that they have to work, nothing about them being missing.
 

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As a tester i asked this question if you could fail them and was told . Can't fail them on an mot yet as vosa are still trying to decide a way for you to test them as some levelling devices cannot be seen
 

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Have a look the the group buy section for my gb for the d1s bulbs.

Plent of photos of mine fitted in the thread.
 

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A thread from AON about bulbs

There's all sorts of talk on here about bulbs, upgrades, and HID conversions. Just wanted to put some information out there about the technical reasons why based in scientific fact, rather than just the "oh it looks cool" or "I want my lights to look blue".

Normal bulbs are incandescent, that is they generate light by passing an electrical current through the filament (normally tungsten) which heats up and, as a by-product of this heating, generates light.
We can fiddle with this light output by tinting the glass and putting various gases (maybe even xenon) inside the bulb to prolong the life of the filament, but the simple fact is that incandescent bulbs are massively wasteful, as they emit across a wide range of the EM spectrum including a large part of the infra red. Only 10% of the power going in actually is converted to light, the rest is lost as heat. Even the most efficient tungsten halogen bulbs (like those in spotlights) are only 25% efficient.

In the drive to get more light on the road, you can get uprated bulbs, generally in terms of power - more current = more light! But at the cost of much more heat.

So here's where the HID (High Intensity Discharge) or Xenon lamp comes in. This relies on luminescence (emission of light at a low temperature) instead and we can carefully select bands where we want emission to avoid wasting power emitting useless energy. They generate light by sending a high voltage arc through an ionised gas (normally xenon - but neon shop signs work on the same principle). Chemicals called metal halides are also added to the bulb to tune the colour and light output. These metal halides are normally solid, so when you turn the lamp on you get the initial flash as the arc strikes, the xenon gas in the bulb generates some light but as the bulb is run at high power the temperature increases and the metal halide evaporates and begins to emit, and the light becomes more spectrally complete (i.e. more colours). This is why when you turn on HIDs you get initial light and then it appears to change colour slightly and brighten.

So what's the point of this you might ask.

Well, a normal vehicle HID bulb will produce between 2,800 and 3,500 lumens (lumens = amount of light) from between 35 and 38W of power whereas a standard halogen filament bulb will only produce between 700 and 2,100 lumens from between 40 and 72W at 12.8V. i.e. you get much more light from much less power.

And what's all this fuss about colour temperature?

This is a misconception, it has nothing to do with the temperature of the light source, it is just a way of measuring the colour of the light produced.
HID bulbs are generally between 4100K and 4400K whereas a normal incandescent bulb would have a colour temp of 3000K to 3500K and therefore the HID lights appear bluer than the yellowish light of the filament bulb. For comparison, sunlight is approx 6500K.

It is another common misconception that the higher the colour temperature then the better it will be. This is not the case, and we can blame our own physiology here. The human eye is optimised for sunlight (green believe it or not) and has very poor response to shorter wavelengths. Wind the colour temp up too high and the peak emission wavelength slides into the blue. The result? All that light and we just can't see it. An 8000K lamp actually produces 70% less visible light than a 4300K one.

And the blue light on OE xenons that everyone raves about? Mostly this is from refraction of the light from the bulb when the lens in the lamp acts like a prism. At the edge of the light beam you can normally see colours, and the blue flash you see is simply the blue of the rainbow created when all the colours produced by the bulb are separated out.
 

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can anyone confirm the correct bulb for a facelift is D1S??

i quite fancy changing my factory xenons to either 5000k or 6000k
 
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