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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Was wondering if anyone on here was clued up and can give me advice on the above

I have been paying for my daughter for many years and she decided this year to leave school and go to college to do a hairdressing course

She got the news today she has been accepted and starts on Jan 5th 2010

I pay just under £60 a week and was wondering if I still have to pay this.

I would like to stop paying it into the X's bank and just give it to my daughter instead seen as she will be a bit strapped

Just wondering what her solicitor would say


I am in scotland so dont know if its the same as England etc

Thanks in advance

Steven
 

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QUOTE(steviek @ 16 Nov 2009, 08:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi

Was wondering if anyone on here was clued up and can give me advice on the above

I have been paying for my daughter for many years and she decided this year to leave school and go to college to do a hairdressing course

She got the news today she has been accepted and starts on Jan 5th 2010

I pay just under £60 a week and was wondering if I still have to pay this.

I would like to stop paying it into the X's bank and just give it to my daughter instead seen as she will be a bit strapped

Just wondering what her solicitor would say


I am in scotland so dont know if its the same as England etc

Thanks in advance

Steven

Hi Steven

As far as I know child maint is payable up to the age of 16 if the child leaves school or 18 if they stay in further education.

So if sheis 18when she starts the course you can give the money straight to your daughter.

Cheers

Ben
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, should have said she is 16 years old

Was just that someone in work said that if she goes to college for hairdressing then i dont need to pay

But if she was going for say higher education etc then I do.....am I making sense ?

S
 

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I think going to college to do hairdressing will still be classed as higher education alternatively speak to the csa i know how bad they are but for advice they can be ok they should be able to clarifyit all for you.

Hope this helps.

Ben
 

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As said before it's 18 if in full time education.
Just get your daughter to come live with you and the ex becomes liable for maintenance.
 

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I'm not sure that hairdressing counts as full time higher education, certainly when my mate did it, it was more part time education and on the job experience. I would check with CAB to make sure though


Hope she enjoys it, my mate gave it up though cos the money was pants even with tips :/
 

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I had a similar experience and the advice I got was I apy till 18 or the end of secondary education. My daughter dropped out of college whilst doing her A levels at 17. The advice then became if she gets a job with training/college/education attached I still had to pay, if she got a 'proper job' and joins the 'adult world', then I no longer had to pay.
I would say that in your case, under the advice I received, you still have to pay the maintenance to your ex, because technically she is still classed as a child.
 

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What was the original agreement? Or is this paid to the CSA?

Effectively in the absence of an agreement then it is usual to pay until age 18 if the child is resident, however, it does vary, indeed many of the older agreements pre student loan etc made provision for 23 to be the cut of in case of University Study

A hair dressing course is Further Education not secondary education in terms of the Education Act

You may find this thread useful http://www.focusstoc.com/forums/Family-Law...ice-t56647.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the replies

Seems a very gray area so gonna bite the bullet and speak to my solicitor £££££££££££££££££££££

It is not paid through the csa but an agreement { through our solicitors }
thanks again

S
 
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